Showing posts with label Mitsubishi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mitsubishi. Show all posts

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Tips to Identify Your Projector Lamp

There are thousands of different projector lamps. If you don't believe me, look at our Website in the Epson Section, as an example.  Epson alone has around 100 different lamps. Last count we had about 3100 unique items with close to 20,000 associated Model numbers. That is a lot of info.

Occasionally we get a call or email asking for a lamp but the customer is not sure of the brand or model.  When you are not the one replacing the lamp and you have to buy the lamp, it can be stressful and difficult without that info.

There are a few tips that I can share that will help. 

First and foremost ask your tech / installer for as much info as possible.  The ideal info is the model number off the projector.  All projectors have a data plate.  Its the sticker or metal plate that has all of the units pertinent info such as the model, serial number, power rating and any certifications.  That plate is usually located on the underside of a projector.  The underside if its sitting on a table. When that is the case, getting that info is easy.

Now say the projector is mounted 30 feet in the air, and you have to rent a lift to get the old lamp out?

The data plate might be blocked by the mount.  It may also have faded from years of sunlight on the sticker.  What can you do?

We have a lot of info at our fingertips.  While we prefer the proper info such as the model number or lamp number, we can usually identify a lamp pretty precisely.

What I am going to teach you is a last ditch option.  After you have exhausted all other options see how this goes.

I'll start with the useless info.  All housings have numbers on them.  Sometimes they mean things.  Many times they don't.

Most lamps will list the type of plastic they are made from. This is one of two types.  PPS and LCP.

PPS is Polyphenylene Sulfide. Its a higher temp thermoplastic that usually has some glass fiber re-enforcing.  Commonly listed as PPS-GF40 (Polyphenylene Sulfide Glass fiber 40%).  You can visually tell by the look of the plastic.  It will be glossy and hard.

The other kind of plastic used is LCP (liquid Crystal Polymer).  It is no better or worse.  I can only speculate on why one would be used over another as they compare almost the same with only negligible differences.

If you see PPS-GF40/GF30 or LCP-GF40, you can ignore those numbers.  They are only useful to the plastic recycling center.

There may also be a 2 digit number. That is usually a mold ID.  When the lamp housing was molded it was done so in a mold that had a number in it. That is for quality tracking.  Also not much help for finding your mystery lamp.

There may be other random letters and numbers. Most of them will be useless.

Here is what you WANT to look for.

Flip the lamp over and look at the back of your bulb.  Most lamps will have markings on the bulb unless its a cheap knock off.  You know how I feel about those.

That bulb will have some numbers.  Those will be helpful. They may not ID the lamp entirely but it will narrow it down immensely.

Refer to this chart:

Ushio:  Look for NSHxxxY(x= numbers, y= letter suffix)  or NSHAxxxY.  NSH refers to a DC (direct current bulb) and should have at least one wire physically attached. NSHA is for AC(alternating current bulb) and will have 2-3 terminals that can have a connector attached via screws. Many Ushio bulbs are purpose made for a specific manufacturer.  For instance, NSH200EDC is a 200W DC lamp made for Eiki with 3 terminals instead of 2.

Philips:  The first number on the sticker is the part number.  In this image the 636 is the part #.  The 90 indicates that this is an aftermarket bulb for Original Inside lamps.
UHP Philips Bulb
We can match that info to a handful of lamps.

Osram:  There will be a sticker on the reflector or text on the read of the ceramic. You are looking for the "PVIP" data.  It will say P-VIP xxx(x= wattage) then the arc gap(1.0 or 0.9 or 0.8) which is the spacing in millimeters inside the arc-tube.  Then the reflector size which will be a P (for parabolic) or E( for elliptical) and a number.

Phoenix: This is the most difficult but fortunately its also rare.  There will be a short number such as SHPxx on an OEM.  The aftermarket lamps are harder.  They use a 3 character listing such as GX4 or SX5.  They have the wires permanently attached and usually are in older lamps.  Even so, if we know you need a lamp with a Phoenix bulb it will still eliminate a lot of variables.


Knowing the brand of the projector will then get us even closer if not to the exact model.

Lastly take a picture for us.  We look at lamps all day long. Whether in our Quality Control Department or by our warehouse staff, some of us can ID a lamp by just seeing it.

Set the lamp on a nice clear background.  White table or solid lighter colored surface.  Put a piece of paper under it if you aren't sure.  Then take a picture looking straight down. Make sure to get the connector in the shot.  Then take another from the bottom with the lamp flipped over.

Refer to the image below. The first two pictures show a POA-LMP94 from a PLV-Z4 /PLV-Z5.  The third picture is the same lamp but while its a 'nice' picture, its not recognizable as easily.

Ideally of course, get the model number.  Even if you have what you believe is the proper Lamp ID , use the Model number.  It is the best way to guarantee you are sent exactly what you need and nothing less.

We can ID most lamps the same day as our staff is highly trained and well versed in finding the lamp you need. Contact us Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm via phone or Chat or anytime at and we will reply the following business day.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Is My Lamp Failing?

How to tell if the Lamp in your Projector or Rear Projection TV has Failed or is About to Fail

Most problems on these TV's are due to lamp problems.  For brand-specific help, just click the appropriate link for your Hitachi, JVC, Mitsubishi, Sony, or Toshiba TV.

Projector lamps from Pureland Supply are only used in Projectors or TVs that use LCD, DLP, D-ILA and LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) display chips. These utilize patented Short Arc technology utilized by Philips, Ushio, Phoenix and Osram.

Projector lamps can easily be replaced by a customer commonly needing nothing more than a screwdriver.  If a special tool is required, it comes packaged with the new lamp.  We stock all popular projection lamps for sale for all brands with Original Bulbs Inside.  There are no replaceable lamps in flat panel TV's (plasma, LCD, and LED TV's), traditional direct view TV's, and the old floor-standing CRT rear projection TV's.

An On Screen Menu is a pattern of text on the screen that the TV generates internally, like the TV menu you get by using the TV remote.  This is the volume display, channel display, input display, etc. If you can see an ON SCREEN MENU, the lamp is not bad.

Usually, a dead lamp can be confirmed by looking at it.  Each lamp contains a thin glass tube.  If this tube is shattered or has a hole melted in it, then it is bad.  Often, people watching the set when the lamp fails will hear a "pop."  A lamp with a crack, blister, or discoloration in the glass tube (down the center) may also indicate failure. 

Occasionally, a lamp will go bad with no visible internal damage.  This can only be confirmed by substituting a good lamp.  Using an Ohm meter or multi-meter won’t work here as these lamps use Short Arc technology.

When a lamp fails to light, the lamp power supply may make a buzzing or sparking noise caused by the excess high voltage being bled off.  On sets that restart several times, this buzzing may be heard on each restart.  This noise is also an indication of a bad lamp.

Bad lamps usually fail to light when the set is powered on, but weak lamps can also blank out while the set is running.  The set may detect this and attempt to restart the lamp.  If the picture and On Screen Menu  go out intermittently, the lamp is the likely culprit.

Here are some common Failure Modes by manufacturer. Your issue may not be listed here specifically but most of these can apply to multiple models/manufacturers. 

Call our well-trained staff at 1-800-664-6671 or email us at or if you are not sure if you need a lamp.

TV starts up with a dark screen, no picture, and no On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the LAMP light on the front of the set stays on constantly.

TV starts up with a dark screen, no picture, and no On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the blue and orange lights on the front panel blink simultaneously and continuously twice per second.

Failure Mode 1:  Projector starts up, attempts to light the lamp. Possibly hearing the ballast 'tick' as it tried to light. Then the Status and power light turn red and the unit shuts down.

Failure Mode 2: (Some models) TV works, but the LAMP lights lights a constant yellow/amber.  This is a warning that the lamp has been used for a certain number of hours and may fail soon.  When you replace the lamp, an on-screen message will ask you to reset the lamp timer, so this warning light turns off.  This must be done using the original TV remote. Set top box remote may not work.

Failure Mode 3: (Some models) Picture flashes, flickers, and/or changes color.  After a few minutes, the set may shutdown.  This may be due to a copy lamp being used.  Make sure the bulb in your lamp is made by Osram of Philips. No-name lamps may cause this issue.

Failure Mode 4:  No fans start when power is pressed. Only the status and power LED flash back and forth.  This indicates the lamp timer as run out and put the unit in protection mode. Refer the manual for proper reset, however most units are reset by holding down the Left and Right directional arrows and Power button on the projector simultaneously for a few seconds to force a timer reset. 

Failure Mode 1: Status Indicator will flash Six times before pausing and then continuing to flash until power is removed. The lamp indicator will also flash on and off until power is removed.

Failure Mode 2: Status light will be off and the lamp indicator will light solid red indicting the lamp has run past 2100 hours and is now in protection mode. This must be reset using the factory remote.  by pressing Help and holding it for about 10 seconds until the Lamp indicator turns off.

Failure Mode 1:  The green POWER light flashes once per second (the normal start-up indication), but the screen is dark with no picture and no On Screen Menu .  The set tries to restart 3 more times, and then the red LAMP light starts blinking.
Failure Mode 2:  The set works OK, but the screen goes dark with no picture or On Screen Menu .  After a few minutes, the picture comes back on by itself but continues to go on and off by itself.  The green POWER light blinks continuously while the picture is out, and there may or may not be sound.
Failure Mode 3:  The set works, but a lamp warning message appears on the screen each time it is turned on. 

Failure Mode 1:  Lamp will remain lit but display a message “Lamp Failure” before shutting down.

Failure Mode 2: No image at all, and the Red lamp indictor will be lit.
Some models will warn you of imminent failure as the lamp nears its 2000-hour life limit.

Failure Mode 1: Lamp Indicator will flash red with standby indicator steady red.

Failure Mode 2: Lamp indicator will be lit steadily as will the power indicator. 

Failure Mode for TVs.  The red light on the front panel comes on constant, and the green light blinks 3 times per second (the normal start-up indication), but the screen is dark with no picture and no On Screen Menu .  The set shuts down and resets itself 8 times.  Then, the green and red lights blink simultaneously and continuously once per second.

Upon start up the fans will run for a few minutes. You will hear the color wheel spin up and the ballast attempting to start. This will repeat three times until the unit confirms the lamp failure. At that point the indicator for the lamp(s) will flash red instead of green. Some models will flash six times before pausing and then flashing again until the power is removed.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Happy New Year from Pureland Supply!

From all of us at Pureland Supply, We wish you a happy and prosperous New Year!

2017 was a fantastic year for Pureland Supply.  We continued to improve our quality and enhance our competitive pricing to ensure maximum value to our customers.  

We plan to make 2018 even better yet.  Keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page for upcoming specials.  We are giving back even more than ever.  2018 is the year for Kindness and Prosperity. 

Until January 15th, we are donating One dollar ($1)for every Facebook Page follow we receive to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to help fund the Adolescent Initiative program.

This program assists with clinical opportunities, education, and provides a safe family gathering event for young adults in high risk HIV environments.

Join us in kicking off the New Year by helping the children.  You do not have to purchase anything.  Head on over via the link to our Facebook page and click the Follow Button. That's it!

We look forward to sharing more information on Projector Lamp tips, tricks and best practices. 

As always, thank you for using for your Projector Lamp needs as we are 

Your Source For Replacement Projector Lamps

Monday, November 27, 2017

Is My Projector Ready for the Holidays?

Unless you are me or involved in the home theater hobby I doubt this is a question you ask yourself. 

However, if you entertain regularly over the holidays it’s something worth considering.  Over the course of the year your projector is pulling a lot of air through it.  That air is used to cool the electronic components as well as the lamp.  Unless you are fortunate enough to live is a sterile environment you will get dust pulled inside with that cooling air.

Over time that dust builds up. That dust can start to prevent the air from cooling.  Once the dust builds up to the point to where it isn’t being cooled anymore and will start to act like insulation keeping the heat in.

Depending on your model, removing that dust can vary.  You always hear, “clean your projector”.  Sure, wipe the outside down and keep that machine looking nice. 

However, there is an entire world going on inside your projector.  Fans, ducts circuit boards Oh My! These all tend to gather dust regardless of how clean your house is.  Electronics in general tend to attract dust due to their nature.

There are many models that use filters.  Those filters vary from a complicated cartridge type that is consumable and requires replacement.  Then there are others that use a simple foam rubber filter on a carrier frame.  More recently the filters have been abandoned for under $1000 models. Instead opting for large open airways to channel the dust in and out rather than filtering it.

Short lamp life is the first symptom. More specifically a progressively shorter lamp life. Each lamp will run but maybe it fails after 500 hours. The next lamp fails after 200 hours.  These hour ratings are examples of course. You may see 1000 hours or more but no where near your original lamps life span.

This particular projector below uses a BL-FU310A which is on sale here. Once you clean your projector your BL-FU310A will run cool and bright.

Here are some examples of what your projector may look like inside if it has never been internally cleaned. Have it cleaned regularly to prevent failure during the holidays. Let us know if you have any question at 1-800-664-6671 or

Here is the side of the DLP Chip Heat-sink.

This is the main cooling Fan. Not moving much air.

Here is an overview of the entire projector’s electronics. That dust will cause heat problems.

This is the ballast. That powers the bulb. With this much dust it overheated and failed. Needed to be replaced, with a repair cost in the hundreds of dollars.

We do offer a Professional Cleaning Option. If this is something you would like to learn more about, please contact us with any questions. - PurelandSupply  1-800-664-6671 /

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Brands we sell continued...

Pureland Supply only sells the highest quality lamps. Our lamps are aftermarket housings engineered to fit the same as the OEM from the manufacturer. 

The brands we carry are:

Digital Projection
Hewlett Packard
Projection Design

Contact us Today at or give a call and speak to a real person instead of a recording. We are here 9-5 Eastern Standard time. You can also email us at